Bran Fenigaid of SILURIAAge: 4610 BCE36

Name
Bran Fenigaid of SILURIA
Birth 10 BCE

Birth of a son
#1
Caradoc of SILURIA
Trevan, Llanilid/Glamorganshire

Death 36 (Age 46)

Family with parents - View family
father
mother
Bran Fenigaid of SILURIA
Birth: 10 BCE
Death: 36
Family with Enygeus Bar MATTHAT - View family
Bran Fenigaid of SILURIA
Birth: 10 BCE
Death: 36
wife
Enygeus Bar MATTHAT
Birth: 12
son
Caradoc of SILURIA
Birth:   — Trevan, Llanilid/Glamorganshire
Death: 54Rome

 
Shared note
Bran, The Blessed, King of Siluria Also known as Bren, Cynvelin and Cunobelinus. He was the son of Llyr and Penarddun. Some sources say he died c. AD 42 and others indicate he was 'old' in AD 60. (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) Bran married a sister of Casswallan, who was his mother's brother. Casswallon was a British king in AD 62 and was made Commander in Chief of all British forces at the time of Caesar's first invasion, BC 55. He was forced to pay tribute and died in BC 48. (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) Children: ? Caradoc (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) ? Adminius, banished in 40 AD (Morgan, 1911) ? Togodumnus (Morgan, 1911) Bran resigned his crown to his son Caradoc and became Arch-Druid of the college of Siluria where he remained some years until called upon to be a hostage for his son. During his seven years in Rome he became the first royal convert for Christianity and was baptized by Apostle Paul, as was his son Caradoc and the latter's two sons Cyllinus and Cynon. Henceforth he was known as the "Blessed Sovereign". He was the first to bring the faith of Christ to the Cymry. He is also attributed as introducing the use of vellum into Britain. (Wurts, 1942) Bran/Cunobelinus was the ruler of a large area of southeastern Britain from about AD 1 to 42. He is Cymbeline in Shakespeare's play of the same name, though the plot bears no relationship to the events of his career. He succeeded his father as chief of the Catuvellauni, a tribe centered north of what is now London. Either shortly before or after his accession, he conquered the territory of the Trinovantes, in modern Essex. He made Camulodunum/Colchester his capital and the seat of his mint. His power and influence were so widely felt in Britain that the Roman biographer Suetonius called him "Britannorum rex." In about 40 AD Cunobelius banished his son Adminius, who fled to Rome and persuaded the emperor Caligula/Gaius Caesar to invade Britain. The expedition was assembled, but it never left the continent. After Cunobelinus' death, his two other sons, Caratacus and Togodumnus, displayed hostility toward Rome and gave Claudius an excuse to impose Roman rule on the island. (Morgan, 1911) Quote attributed to Bren: "Let him who is a chief be a bridge." (Wurts, 1942)