Caradoc of SILURIA54

Name
Caradoc of SILURIA
Birth
Trevan, Llanilid/Glamorganshire

Death of a wifeGenuissa Venessa Claudia of ROME
50

Death 54
Rome

Family with parents - View family
father
Bran Fenigaid of SILURIA
Birth: 10 BCE
Death: 36
mother
Enygeus Bar MATTHAT
Birth: 12
Caradoc of SILURIA
Birth:   — Trevan, Llanilid/Glamorganshire
Death: 54Rome
Family with Genuissa Venessa Claudia of ROME - View family
Caradoc of SILURIA
Birth:   — Trevan, Llanilid/Glamorganshire
Death: 54Rome
wife
Genuissa Venessa Claudia of ROME
Birth:   — Italy
Death: 50
son

 
Shared note
Caradoc King of Siluria from http://www.allcensus.com/genealogy/pafn510.htm Also known as Caractacus, Caratacus, Caradawg "Strong Arm". He was the son of Bran. Caradoc was born at Trevan, Llanilid/Glamorganshire. His main residence was at Abergwaredigion, "the Meeting-Place of the Saved/Released Ones". (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) Children: ? Cyllinus/Linus (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) ? Eurgan/Claudia (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) ? Cynon ? Cawrdav Tacitus, describing the stand made by the Silurians under Caradoc ap Bran at Caer Caradoc, near Knighton, county Radnor, states: "The intrepid countenances of their whole army and the spirit which animated them, struck the Roman commander, Ostorius, with astonishment...The chieftains of the various tribes were seen busy in every direction. They raced along the ranks of their army. They exhorted their warriors, they roused the timid, they inured the valient, and by promises inflamed the ardour of all...Caractacus was seen alternately in every part of his army. He galloped along the lines, exclaiming aloud: 'This day, my comrades, this very day, decides the fate of all Britain!' " Caradoc was expecting Gwyn to arrive with reinforcements, but they missed each other and while General Gwyn was conquering Caerwent, Caradoc was captured by Argwedd Voeddig, Queen Cartismandua of the north of England - a.k.a Brynack of the Britons and Brigante, the wife of Gwyn. In chains, Caradoc was handed a captive to the Roman General Ostorius Scapula. Caradoc and his son Cyllin/Linus, and his daughter Eurgain/Claudia of Caesar's household, were afterwards placed in Rome in the care of Pomponia Graecenia, wife of the Roman Regent, General Plautus who had been commander in the invasion of AD 43. Pomponia was later charged at Rome with having "embraced a foreign superstition". (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) Caratacus' kingdom covered the Atrebates of Hampshire and probably the Dobunni of Gloucestershire. At the time of the Roman invasion of Britain during the reign of Claudius, he led the native resistance against Aulus Plautis (AD 43-47) and after being defeated, withdrew into south Wales. He was finally defeated by Ostorius Scapula in AD 50, somewhere in the Welsh marshes, in the territory of the Ordovices. He himself fled to the Brigantes, whose queen, Cartimandua, delivered him to the Romans. He and his family were featured in a victory parade of Claudius, who granted them pardon and life. (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) A quote attributed to Caradoc is: "Oppression persisted in brings on death". (Wurts, 1942) Caradoc King of Siluria Also known as Caractacus, Caratacus, Caradawg "Strong Arm". He was the son of Bran. Caradoc was born at Trevan, Llanilid/Glamorganshire. His main residence was at Abergwaredigion, "the Meeting-Place of the Saved/Released Ones". (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) Children: ? Cyllinus/Linus (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) ? Eurgan/Claudia (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) ? Cynon ? Cawrdav Tacitus, describing the stand made by the Silurians under Caradoc ap Bran at Caer Caradoc, near Knighton, county Radnor, states: "The intrepid countenances of their whole army and the spirit which animated them, struck the Roman commander, Ostorius, with astonishment...The chieftains of the various tribes were seen busy in every direction. They raced along the ranks of their army. They exhorted their warriors, they roused the timid, they inured the valient, and by promises inflamed the ardour of all...Caractacus was seen alternately in every part of his army. He galloped along the lines, exclaiming aloud: 'This day, my comrades, this very day, decides the fate of all Britain!' " Caradoc was expecting Gwyn to arrive with reinforcements, but they missed each other and while General Gwyn was conquering Caerwent, Caradoc was captured by Argwedd Voeddig, Queen Cartismandua of the north of England - a.k.a Brynack of the Britons and Brigante, the wife of Gwyn. In chains, Caradoc was handed a captive to the Roman General Ostorius Scapula. Caradoc and his son Cyllin/Linus, and his daughter Eurgain/Claudia of Caesar's household, were afterwards placed in Rome in the care of Pomponia Graecenia, wife of the Roman Regent, General Plautus who had been commander in the invasion of AD 43. Pomponia was later charged at Rome with having "embraced a foreign superstition". (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) Caratacus' kingdom covered the Atrebates of Hampshire and probably the Dobunni of Gloucestershire. At the time of the Roman invasion of Britain during the reign of Claudius, he led the native resistance against Aulus Plautis (AD 43-47) and after being defeated, withdrew into south Wales. He was finally defeated by Ostorius Scapula in AD 50, somewhere in the Welsh marshes, in the territory of the Ordovices. He himself fled to the Brigantes, whose queen, Cartimandua, delivered him to the Romans. He and his family were featured in a victory parade of Claudius, who granted them pardon and life. (Wurts, 1942; Morgan, 1911) A quote attributed to Caradoc is: "Oppression persisted in brings on death". (Wurts, 1942) from http://www.allcensus.com/genealogy/pafn510.htm