JohnWJackson2.jpg

John W. JACKSONAge: 9718421940

Name
John W. JACKSON
Birth October 18, 1842 23 26
Woodsfield, Monroe, Ohio

MarriageMinnie HOSBERGView family
(?)

DivorceMinnie HOSBERGView family
(?)

Birth of a brotherA.g. JACKSON
about 1842
Monroe County, Ohio

Birth of a brotherJames JACKSON
about 1844 (Age 14 months)
Monroe County, Ohio

Birth of a sisterHuldah JACKSON
about 1848 (Age 5)
Monroe County, Ohio

Birth of a brotherSamuel JACKSON
about 1850 (Age 7)
Monroe County, Ohio

Birth of a brotherJoshua JACKSON
about 1852 (Age 9)
Monroe County, Ohio

Birth of a brotherWilliam Tyler JACKSON
about 1854 (Age 11)
Monroe County, Ohio

Birth of a brotherSimon Peter JACKSON
April 12, 1855 (Age 12)
Monroe County, Ohio

Birth of a brotherNathan H. JACKSON
about 1856 (Age 13)
Monroe County, Ohio

Death of a maternal grandfatherJoshua HAWKINS
January 24, 1856 (Age 13)
Jackson Ridge, Monroe, Ohio

Death of a maternal grandfatherJoshua HAWKINS
January 24, 1856 (Age 13)
Jackson Ridge, Monroe, Ohio, USA

MarriageMary (Molly) E. HASTINGSView family
February 6, 1866 (Age 23)
Geurnsey County, Ohio

Birth of a daughter
#1
Ida Belle JACKSON
August 13, 1867 (Age 24)
Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio

Birth of a daughter
#2
Etta JACKSON
February 21, 1872 (Age 29)

Birth of a son
#3
George H. JACKSON
November 14, 1881 (Age 39)

Marriage of a childNewton Aldridge SWIFTIda Belle JACKSONView family
June 24, 1884 (Age 41)
Antrim County, Michigan

Death of a motherIdney HAWKINS
December 1, 1889 (Age 47)
New Freeport, PA

Death of a fatherSimon JACKSON
December 24, 1910 (Age 68)
Monroe County, Ohio

Death of a wifeMary (Molly) E. HASTINGS
December 2, 1913 (Age 71)
Mill City, Linn, Oregon

Burial of a wifeMary (Molly) E. HASTINGS
December 1913 (Age 71)
Fairview cemetery, Mill City, Oregon

Occupation
Farmer

Death January 23, 1940 (Age 97)
Mill City, Linn, Oregon

Burial January 1940 (Age 97)
Fairview cemetery, Mill City, Oregon

Record Change August 10, 2000 (60 years after death)

Family with parents - View family
father
Simon JACKSON
Birth: December 14, 1818 33 23Monroe County, Ohio
Death: December 24, 1910Monroe County, Ohio
mother
Idney HAWKINS
Birth: January 23, 1816 35 32Fairmont, West Virginia
Death: December 1, 1889New Freeport, PA
 
Marriage: January 10, 1839Monroe County, Ohio
2 years
elder brother
Aaron JACKSON
Birth: about 1840 21 23Monroe County, Ohio
3 years
brother
A.g. JACKSON
Birth: about 1842 23 25Monroe County, Ohio
10 months
JohnWJackson2.jpg John W. JACKSON
Birth: October 18, 1842 23 26Woodsfield, Monroe, Ohio
Death: January 23, 1940Mill City, Linn, Oregon
2 years
younger brother
James JACKSON
Birth: about 1844 25 27Monroe County, Ohio
5 years
younger sister
Huldah JACKSON
Birth: about 1848 29 31Monroe County, Ohio
3 years
younger brother
Samuel Jackson.jpg Samuel JACKSON
Birth: about 1850 31 33Monroe County, Ohio
3 years
younger brother
Joshua JACKSON
Birth: about 1852 33 35Monroe County, Ohio
3 years
younger brother
William Tyler JACKSON
Birth: about 1854 35 37Monroe County, Ohio
15 months
younger brother
Simon Peter JACKSON
Birth: April 12, 1855 36 39Monroe County, Ohio
21 months
younger brother
Nathan H. JACKSON
Birth: about 1856 37 39Monroe County, Ohio
Family with Mary (Molly) E. HASTINGS - View family
JohnWJackson2.jpg John W. JACKSON
Birth: October 18, 1842 23 26Woodsfield, Monroe, Ohio
Death: January 23, 1940Mill City, Linn, Oregon
wife
MaryHastings2.jpg Mary (Molly) E. HASTINGS
Birth: December 25, 1840 21 20Ohio
Death: December 2, 1913Mill City, Linn, Oregon
 
Marriage: February 6, 1866Geurnsey County, Ohio
18 months
daughter
IdaBelleJackson.jpg Ida Belle JACKSON
Birth: August 13, 1867 24 26Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio
Death: February 8, 1951Mill City, Linn, Oregon
5 years
daughter
Etta JACKSON
Birth: February 21, 1872 29 31
10 years
son
George H. JACKSON
Birth: November 14, 1881 39 40
Family with Minnie HOSBERG - View family
JohnWJackson2.jpg John W. JACKSON
Birth: October 18, 1842 23 26Woodsfield, Monroe, Ohio
Death: January 23, 1940Mill City, Linn, Oregon
ex-wife
 
Marriage:   — (?)

 
Shared note
John Jackson served in Company 'D' 116th Ohio Volunteers with his brother Abram who was a sergeant. Also in that company were two cousins, Leonard Jackson, son of Jesse Jackson Jr. of Centre township, Monroe County, Ohio, and Wilson S. Jackson of Silas and Sarah Jackson, also of Monroe County. Early life was all in Monroe County, Centre Township. He lived with his parents near Clarington. After serving in the Grand Army of the Republic, he went back to Ohio. He was married to Mary E. Hastings in Guernsey County, Ohio in 1866. He lived in Guernsey county for a short while. His daughter, Ida Belle, was born there in 1867. The birthplace of his children indicates he moved to Michigan about 1870, or before. In 1890, he and his family moved to Mill City, Oregon, where he lived to the age of 97 years. The following is from the local newspaper: John W. Jackson, who passed away on January 23, at the age of 97, was the last member of the G. A. R. (Grand Army of the Republic) in the Willamette Valley. This remarkable old soldier, whose keen mind could still clearly recall stirring historical memories, had made his home for the past 17 years with his daughter, Mrs. Ida Belle Swift, at Mill City where he died just a week after his last walk to town. Funeral services were held from the home Wednesday afternoon, January 24, with grave side services at Fairview cemetery. There were no flowers nor music according to the old gentleman's wishes. Jackson was the last member of the Stayton Post of the G. A. R., the old flag of the post being buried with him, which is traditional. Not log ago Mr. Jackson was privileged as the last living member to turn over the G. A. R. hall to the Women's auxiliary, whose session he attended as the guest of honor. Never having been attended by a doctor in his life, except during a slight attack of indigestion, until the last four days of his life. Jackson is survived by the following: Tow daughter, Mrs. Ida B. Swift of Mill City, Mrs Edna McAlvay of Lansing, Michigan, one son, George Jackson of Traverse City, Michigan, a granddaughter, Laura Bertram of Mill city, ten great-grandchildren and 11 great-great- grandchildren. The only unbroken line of five generations included Jackson himself, Mrs. Swift, Mrs. Bertram, Mrs. Don goode of Stayton and David Goode. John Jackson was born on a farm in Monroe County,, Ohio, Oct. 14, 1842, at the age of 19, on August 14, 1862, he enlisted at Woodsfield, Ohio in Co. "D", 116th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was immediately shipped to the barracks of the 92nd Infantry at Marietta, Ohio where he remained for ten days and then to Parkersburg, VA under General Milroy. On April 17th 1863, he was part of the force which started on a march to Winchester in the Shenandoah Valley. He was present on the Gettysburg field at the end of the famous three-day battle, arriving at Winchester in time to join General Sherman in his famous Shenandoah Valley March. The following is from the "Salem Statesman', March 1938. the article begins with a photograph of John W. Jackson with the caption "A Salute" under the photograph. The article continues as follows: One of the only known G. A. R. members left in the Willamette Valley, this picture brings to you John W. Jackson. to those of us of the present younger generation, his story is almost unbelievable. We can easily remember studying Civil War history and can readily call to mind some of the exciting episodes that we read therein, and therein lies the reason for the salute to his man, for he is alive and keen today, years after we read of these historical events, an actual witness to dozens of the scenes and events that we studied. In 1862, at the age of 19 years, Mr. Jackson enlisted on the 14th day of August at Woodsfield, Ohio, in company 'D' 116th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at which time he was sworn in for three years, or the duration of the Civil War. He was called for duty August 21st and took a boat at Clarrington, Ohio, for Marietta, Ohio, for his destination of the barracks of the 92nd Infantry where he remained for ten days. From this point he was advanced into the very midst of the war between the North and the South. Lack of space in these columns prohibits us launching into a full description of the months of army service that followed for Jackson. This man was present on the Gettysburg field at the end of the famous three day battle, July 5th 1863. He was part of the force who harassed General Lee's retreating army as they fled across the Potomac. his is a picturesque description of the battle at 'Bloody Lane'/ He sends the chills racing the length of one's spine as he described the way that the razorback hogs routed out the dead. He gives a graphic picture in words of this battle and tells of trees trimmed even and level at 40 inches by bullets of both armies. He paints a clear picture of a church cross being shattered by a cannon ball and rifle shot -the Dunkard Church. From the scene of this famous battlefield his company removed to Winchester in the Shenandoah Balley about July 15, 1864, as a soldier in the Second Division, he was ordered aboard a train by General Grant, with Washington City as their destination. Again, space prohibits detailed description of the scenes and events this man describes. On the 9th day of April 1864, he was part of the army that stopped square in General Lee's path where the Union Army waited Lee's next move. It was here that Lee's army brandished a white flag. It was here that the Union army saw the Stars and Stripes raised round about the rebel army on the hilltops and promontories, (Search your history books for the Civil War battle at Lynchburg for this particular scene). It is at this particular point in history that Mr. Jackson vehemently refutes historians. It is his claim that here was no fighting at this particular point, that not a cannon was fired. It was here that General Lee marched the full length of the village street to McLain House with three officers attending , to surrender the Southern Army's cause. He was forced to wait nearly an hour before General Grant could be located. At this time one cannon was fired, more as a signal, Jackson says, than a challenge. He and his comrades were then ordered to stack arms and stand by. It was here a short time later in the day that he witnessed and heard from a distance of sixty paces that moment occasion of Grant refusing to accept Lee's sword in surrender, and therein lies the unbelievable point of this story. To interview this man is very similar to removing a living page from our history books. Later, at Richmond, Virginia, Mr. Jackson was mustered out of the service of the 14th day of June 1865. In describing that scene, there are tears in the eyes of this remarkable old man as he recalls the words of his commanding captain, MacCumber, "Boys, you are done doing duty, be as good citizens as you were soldiers. Unborn generations will point with pride to your heroic fighting and hard marching, I'm glad it's over." Today at the age of 95 years, 6 months, J. W. Jackson can recall with keenness these scenes, the above describe3d dates and incidents. In tribute to his service for the sake of the Union, we say again-Salute. The following excerpts are from records applying for a pension for John W. Jackson: As my several places of abode since my return from the army has been called for world state that I enlisted at Woodsfield, Ohio after being discharged, I returned to Woodsfield in Monroe, County, Ohio, from there I went to Londoner in the county of Guernsey, from there I moved to VanWert in the County of VanWert, in June of 1870, I moved to Root Ville in the county of Antrim, State of Michigan. My present post office address is Central Lake in the county of Antrim and the state of Michigan. My occupation has been farming. I , Adam J. Myers, aged 49 years, a resident of the State of Ohio, says, that I am a farmer for at least 35 years. That I was acquainted with said soldier, John Jackson from about March 17, 1860 to June 1865, and that my knowledge of the matters hereinafter stated was derived while I sustained the relation of Orderly Sergeant, serving in the same Company, to said soldier. In reference to when, where and under what circumstances said soldier became disabled by disease of eyes and his physical condition as affected the following manner, to-wit" While at Romney, W. VA the winter of '63', John Jackson was detailed to cook for the company after he cooked a while, his eyes began to get sore and run water, I reported him to the doctor, he said that Jackson would have to quit cooking. His eyes always bothered him afterwards. I was with him up to the time of our discharge in 1865. Personal description on 'declaration of Pension" Height, 5' 91/2"; Complexion, dark; Color of hair, black; color of eyes, hazel; occupation, Farmer. Robert Swift, great-grandson of John W. Jackson relates the following story told to him by his great-grandfather: During the Civil War, he and his fellow soldiers lived off the land. They found a pig and chased after it. One soldier managed to hack at it with his sword, cutting off a sizable chunk of meat before the pig escaped. The soldiers cooked the meat and all but Jackson ate of it. The men became extremely ill. There was even a fear that some of those soldiers might die. Great-Granddaughter, Lenore Swift Stanley relates the following: Grandpa Jackson built a house across the street from us. He and Gertrude Swift Cuttler, the sister of his son-in-law, Newton Swift, couldn't stand each other. Grandpa Jackson enjoyed sitting on his porch and watch the construction of the new house going up next door to him. Finally the house was finished and the new occupant moved in. It was Gertrude Cuttler. After that, they each spent hours sitting on their own front porches, saying nothing, just glowering at each other. Great-granddaughter Ione Bertram Goode recalls: John Jackson would not allow his daughter, Ida Jackson Swift to buy a wedding gift for Ione, because Ione married the son of the man who was his attorney during his divorce from Minnie Hosberg. John Jackson was so upset he quit the Masons. He figured he should have received the honors, because his time in Michigan and Stayton totaled more than the other fellow.
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